Gender Odyessy: Height Oppression Panelists Needed

 

Call for Speakers at Gender Odyssey Seattle Conference Workshop and Panel Presentation on Height Oppression.

Sam Davis, a genderqueer transguy from the San Francisco Bay Area, will be presenting a workshop at the Gender Odyssey conference on Friday 8/3, including a panel presentation and group discussion on height oppression. His aim is to create a dialogue strategizing ways that short people who pass as male can use language to empower themselves when being disrespected, bullied, or looked down on (in every sense of the word) for being short.

He is looking for short cis men and trans people who pass primarily as male, who might consider speaking about their experiences dealing with both the overt and the more subtle, pervasive forms of height discrimination we experience. As a progressive community, we have found creative ways to use language and empowering rhetoric to respect ourselves as queer and as trans and as feminists and anti-racists and disability rights activists.

Using these models and other examples of movement-building as a starting point, the workshop aims to articulate what height oppression means, deconstruct how it manifests in everyday interactions, and identify ways to challenge it. Sam is looking for a panel of speakers, including both non-trans men and trans-identified people who typically pass as male, straight and queer, as diverse a panel as possible, to share experiences of height oppression throughout our lives, and name examples of ways different people have found to stand up against it.

Amazingly, it is commonly taken for granted that saying,”Wow I feel so tall around you!” is acceptable, while any other similar comment asserting one’s privilege over another person with a visibly less-valued aspect of physical appearance would be immediately challenged by anyone who considers themselves progressive-minded.

Sam is looking for a panel of speakers who are comfortable talking about what kinds of discrimination they have dealt with over the course of their lives, and how they have survived it with dignity. The panel presentation will be followed by group dialogue brainstorming possibilities to create empowering language for short male-presenting people, and empowering responses to different situations involving discrimination, disrespect, patronizing, bullying, and subtle indicators of being viewed as inferior.

Please contact Sam Davis if you would consider speaking as part of the panel.

He can be reached by email at: samdavis66@sbcglobal.net. He will then arrange a phone conversation to talk more about the particular experiences you might like to bring up, and ways this form of discrimination intersects with different sources of oppression in our culture.

 

SeaLinc2:

This is just one of the things that makes me feel like I can’t be on my own neighborhood after dark. I’m disabled and trans, and have been told to “move along” by cops before when hanging out at night on Pike/Pine. Part of me thinks it’s because more wealthy white straight people are moving into the neighborhood.

But it really sucks feeling like I have to “get out” of my own neighborhood by a certain time each night. And I’m getting tired of feeling like I should just accept it and move on. This idea that if you aren’t doing anything wrong, then you shouldn’t have to fear the cops is another way of keeping people from speaking up when they know something isn’t right. The thing is, people want to believe that the police would never treat them like that. But they will if they can figure out how to.

Police don’t need an excuse, and as things get worse out here, they need less and less of one every day.

Originally posted on Black Orchid Collective:

One of the six people bashed and arrested last Saturday night at Pride during the Queers Fucking Queers street dance party has written about her experiences that night. For updates on the arrestees, please follow the Grand Legion of Incendiary and Tenacious Unicorn Revolutionaries (GLTUR) on the web, Facebook, and twitter. For more background, please read jomo206′s post “It doesn’t get better, we rebel to make it better!

Last Saturday night, I went to meet some friends on Capitol Hill to go to a queer dance party in the street. I was excited to celebrate, dance and attempt to push the idea of pride weekend a little further away from its current state of corporate sponsored, assimilationist dismissal of all that is joyful, free and queer. I brought my bunny mask as it seemed like just the sort of occasion to wear it.

There was supposed…

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Want To Be a Civil Rights Commissioner?

If you live in King County, and are committed for fighting for people’s civil rights, this may be just the opportunity you’ve been waiting for!

 

King County residents interested in public service and raising community awareness and involvement in civil rights issues are invited to apply for one of three positions on the King County Civil Rights Commission. If selected and confirmed by the King County Council, commissioners serve three-year terms.

 The Civil Rights Commission advises the County Executive and County Council on matters related to the county’s civil rights programs and on human and civil rights issues. This includes reviewing and reporting on the effectiveness and progress of the county’s affirmative action, non-discrimination enforcement, and minority/women business utilization programs, as well as educating the community about preventing and eliminating discrimination. In addition, the commission works to educate the community about the county’s Equity and Social Justice Ordinance.

The Civil Rights Commission is soliciting applications from individuals in County Council District 2 (represented by Council Chair Larry Gossett), which covers the Beacon Hill, Capitol Hill, Central Area, Fremont, Laurelhurst, Rainier Valley, Ravenna, Seward Park, Skyway, and University District neighborhoods of Seattle.

A second position is open in County Council District 9, represented by Councilmember Reagan Dunn. This district covers parts of Bellevue, Kent, and Renton, as well as the communities of Black Diamond, Covington, Enumclaw, Maple Valley, and Newcastle, and unincorporated areas of southeast King County.

There is also an At-large Commissioner position which is open to applicants from any County Council district. An interactive map of County Council districts is available online at www.kingcounty.gov/council.

 Commission members must live in King County. If confirmed by the County Council, commissioners serve without pay. Residents from diverse ethnic and protected group backgrounds, including people with disabilities, are encouraged to apply. All commission members are bound by the King County Code of Ethics and are required to complete a financial disclosure statement upon appointment and by April 15 of each succeeding year of service.

Potential candidates should have interests and experience related to the goals of the commission, live in the appropriate County Council district, and be able to commit eight to ten hours monthly to commission meetings and work projects.  This includes attending monthly meetings on the third Wednesday of each month from 3 – 5 p.m., and participating in committee work, which can require additional meetings.

For more information on the Civil Rights Commission and its activities, please visit www.kingcounty.gov/exec/CRC.aspx or contact commission administrator Paula Harris-White at 206-296-8610 or paula.harris-white@kingcounty.gov.

Paula Harris-White, J.D.

Administrator,
KING COUNTY CIVIL RIGHTS COMMISSION

EMPLOYEE-BASED EE0/AA ADVISORY COMMITTEE

CNK-ES-0215
401 FIFTH AVENUE, SUITE 215
SEATTLE WA 98104
Phone: 206-296-8610   Fax: 206-296-4329

 

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks April 19th!

Direct from the Seattle Office of Civil Rights:

Seattle University and Mt. Zion Baptist Church are teaming up to bring awareness to social justice issues, with a major community event this spring. In keeping with SU’s mission of empowering leaders for a just and humane world, David (Sonny) Lacks will join a conversation about his mother, science and other issues addressed in, “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.”

Soon to be made into an HBO movie by Oprah Winfrey and Alan Ball, this New York Times bestseller takes readers on an extraordinary journey, from the “colored” ward of Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s to stark white laboratories with freezers filled with HeLa cells, from Henrietta’s small, dying hometown of Clover, Virginia, to East Baltimore today, where her children and grandchildren live and struggle with the legacy of her cells. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew. It’s a story inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, and the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we’re made of. – Author Rebecca Skloot

 The event is free and open to the public. The conversation will feature a chat with Sonny Lacks, as he speaks about the book and the impact of the phenomenon surrounding his mother’s cells. The discussion will be moderated by Vivian Phillips, Executive Director of Marketing and Communications for the Seattle Theater Group and Adjunct Professor in Fine Arts, MFA in Arts Leadership at SU.

 For more information about Seattle University’s Center for Justice in Society and to reserve tickets, please visit: http://www.seattleu.edu/csjs/default.aspx?id=25068

WHEN: April 19, 2012   7 – 8:30 p.m.

WHERE: Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 1634 19th Avenue,  Seattle, WA 98122

 Contact:  Stacy Howard, Seattle University, 206-890-9013        

 Office, Mount Zion Baptist Church, 206-322-6500

Here’s a flyer on the event: