Need some Rewards? CAP has rewards.

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I got turned on to the CAP program through a book I read. It sounded fairly simple, so I think I’ll give it a try. The post will be sticky for awhile. No matter what I did, I couldn’t get it to work as a widget. (Yay technology!)

I will post updates as I get paid and learn more.

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Vote for Me! 12 Days to Win $1,000!

Hey loyal readers:

I have founded a group called Trans Lives Matter. We’re new, and dedicated to providing direct service in transgender communities.

This week we’re part of a competition at Echoing Green where they’re giving away a $1,000 grant to one group. The grant goes to the group who gets the most votes. We’ll be doing outreach across different demographics of trans communities, and we’re the only trans specific group in the competition.

That’s why I need your help please. Every single vote matters, and we don’t get the money if we don’t come in number one.

So go to this page, vote for us, and tell everyone you know!

http://purpose.maker.good.is/projects/TransFamily

Thank you for helping us make the world a better place. 🙂

50 Shades of Grayskull

Here it is, for folks who had this thought: I cannot go another day without a 50 Shades of Gray parody that involves He-Man.

You have your wish, and it’s AWESOME!

h/t   to Renee at Womanist Musings..otherwise I still would be too braindead to post.

Music Video: Westlife

Hey Folks:

So much news is running through my brain I can’t parse it out quick enough to figure out what to write about. I’m involved in some fundraising and grant writing, and am trying to finish up a couple of library books I can’t renew again.

Since my brain and fingers can’t work together, you get a music video for your enjoyment. A video from a grown man who is a fan of the boy band WestLife. Yep. Here you are:

What the heck, let’s make it a double feature! Give it up for LeAnn Rimes!

Gender Odyessy: Height Oppression Panelists Needed

 

Call for Speakers at Gender Odyssey Seattle Conference Workshop and Panel Presentation on Height Oppression.

Sam Davis, a genderqueer transguy from the San Francisco Bay Area, will be presenting a workshop at the Gender Odyssey conference on Friday 8/3, including a panel presentation and group discussion on height oppression. His aim is to create a dialogue strategizing ways that short people who pass as male can use language to empower themselves when being disrespected, bullied, or looked down on (in every sense of the word) for being short.

He is looking for short cis men and trans people who pass primarily as male, who might consider speaking about their experiences dealing with both the overt and the more subtle, pervasive forms of height discrimination we experience. As a progressive community, we have found creative ways to use language and empowering rhetoric to respect ourselves as queer and as trans and as feminists and anti-racists and disability rights activists.

Using these models and other examples of movement-building as a starting point, the workshop aims to articulate what height oppression means, deconstruct how it manifests in everyday interactions, and identify ways to challenge it. Sam is looking for a panel of speakers, including both non-trans men and trans-identified people who typically pass as male, straight and queer, as diverse a panel as possible, to share experiences of height oppression throughout our lives, and name examples of ways different people have found to stand up against it.

Amazingly, it is commonly taken for granted that saying,”Wow I feel so tall around you!” is acceptable, while any other similar comment asserting one’s privilege over another person with a visibly less-valued aspect of physical appearance would be immediately challenged by anyone who considers themselves progressive-minded.

Sam is looking for a panel of speakers who are comfortable talking about what kinds of discrimination they have dealt with over the course of their lives, and how they have survived it with dignity. The panel presentation will be followed by group dialogue brainstorming possibilities to create empowering language for short male-presenting people, and empowering responses to different situations involving discrimination, disrespect, patronizing, bullying, and subtle indicators of being viewed as inferior.

Please contact Sam Davis if you would consider speaking as part of the panel.

He can be reached by email at: samdavis66@sbcglobal.net. He will then arrange a phone conversation to talk more about the particular experiences you might like to bring up, and ways this form of discrimination intersects with different sources of oppression in our culture.

 

Review: Kiva.org

Hey everybody:

So I was making a new loan tonight, and realized I haven’t said anything about Kiva.org on my blog yet! That is a heinous oversight that has to be remedied immediately.

I’ve been partnering with Kiva loans since 2009, when I first put in some money for a loan to a woman in Cambodia who runs a grocery store. Just the idea was so amazing that I was hooked instantly. It was almost beyond my imagination that $25 would go far enough where she lived to help put extra stock on her store shelves, and get the door on her house fixed. All that needed to happen on my end was to ease up on buying used books for a month, and maybe go without a couple other things.

The coolest part is that once I made about three or four loans the money started to recirculate itself. See, you CAN lend more, but the average amount is $25. So, as each business owner made payments, some of the funds came back to me. They sat in my Kiva portfolio as credit, waiting to go back out. Every time my inbox level reached $30 (to cover the $3 lending fee), I would send it back out to someone else. At this point, it’s like microenterprise owners around the world are lending to each other, using me and Kiva as a go-between!

Here are some screenshots from my Kiva accounts page. First, a quick overlook at my loan status:

Next, a look at how my loans break down by the gender of people I’m lending to:

Now the loans are broken down by what type of business people are in:

And lastly, a look at loans by country:

I would strongly encourage people who may not have thought about this concept to check out www.kiva.org and give serious thought to making a loan part of your giving experience.

As you can see, I’ve mostly been loaning to women. A good part of that reasoning came from studies about microenterprise I’ve read. They have found that when the lives and resources of women in different countries are strengthened, their whole communities benefit. Lately I’ve also been thinking about targeting loans to the Middle East. I mean, we’ve gone in and really bombed that area to bits. Don’t I have an obligation as an American to help rebuild it by empowering the people who live there?

If I had one wish with Kiva, it would be the ability to further target loans. I would like to be able to loan to other transgender people. Now, there are some countries where it’s just not possible to be out. But there have to be some places where having access to microenterprise could really improve the lives of transgender people.

But regardless, I am going to keep partnering with Kiva, because good work gets done there, and I’ve never seen $25 do so much! Do look into it folks.