Cartoon: Black History and Guns

Mass shootings again this week, and black communities are dealing with the impacts of more folks murdered by police. The air is heavy with every kind of feeling. Still, some jackasses say this isn’t the time to talk about guns.

But guns have never been separate from race in America. It goes much further back than Reagan signing the Mulford Act to stop the Black Panthers from carrying guns in the 60s. To see even a sliver of it, you have to go all the way back to the founding of the country. I brought in this little cartoon to drop that knowledge.

Gay Muslim Survival Guide

Ify Okoye

A number of people have asked me to explain or clarify issues raised in my coming out post, Yes, I Am. So here’s an attempt to respond to that feedback as well as offer some constructive points of advice for my fellow LGBT Muslims.

I am Muslim, by choice. Faith is central to my identity and without it I’d be lost as I still clearly remember my life before Islam.

So how do we reconcile faith with sexual orientation or sexuality? This is perhaps the most commonly asked question for gay Muslims but for me the question misses the larger point that orientation is not the same as sexuality. Beyond semantics, some of the language used to describe orientation is unhelpful. Orientation is not limited to who you sleep with and who you sleep with does not necessarily define your orientation. While our community has many hang-ups when it comes…

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Dr. James Miranda Barry

The Drummer's Revenge

By the time Dr. James Miranda Barry reached Canada in 1858, he was already a legend in medical and military circles.

Barry had a reputation for being a genius as a surgeon. He had performed the first successful Caesarean section by a British doctor — only the sixth known successful Caesarean by a European. He also understood the importance of sanitation long before European medicine realized how infection worked. In an age when bloodletting by leeches and freezing the patient were common cures, Barry was an apostle of scientific medicine. In an era that thought that bathing, fresh air, and fresh food were harmful to the sick, he prescribed these things. The mortality rate dropped instantly in any hospital he was in charge of.

He was also considered a man of high and progressive ideals – he fought tirelessly for the right to medical treatment for women, for blacks, and…

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